Keynotes


2018 Keynotes

Smart Healthcare

Niraj K. Jha
Department of Electrical Engineering
Princeton University

Abstract:

The Internet-of-Things (IoT) era promises hundreds of billions of devices or physical objects connected to the Internet.  These objects include sensors, actuators, and processing elements that help us gather data, make intelligent decisions, and optimize processes. IoT is expected to have a potential economic impact of $3-6 trillionper year by 2025, with $1-2.5 trillion of this economic impact (its largest fraction) coming from smart healthcare applications. These applications will be enabled by wearable medical sensors (WMSs) that will transmit their information to a personal health hub, such as a smartphone or smartwatch.  The sensors and the health hub form a body-area network (BAN). The BAN will communicate with a health server over the Internet, making a complete personal healthcare system possible.  The doctors can communicate with the health server to keep track of an individual’s health. However, many challenges remain in making this vision a reality.

In this talk, we will explore smart healthcare from two angles: energy-efficient inference on WMSs and use of such sensors in various applications. Energy-efficient inference is made possible on sensor nodes by exploiting sparsity, which is characteristic of a signal that allows us to represent information efficiently. We will look at an approach that enables efficient representations based on sparsity to be utilized throughout a signal processing system, with the aim of reducing the energy and/or resources required for computation, communication, and storage. Such intelligent WMSs can be expected to be an important pillar of smart healthcare.  We will then explore the use of WMSs in various applications: energy- and storage-efficient continuous health monitoring, medical diagnosis in the context of a health decision support system, stress detection/alleviation, etc. Finally, we will discuss some of the security issues associated with smart healthcare.

Biography:

Niraj K. Jha received his B.Tech. degree in Electronics and Electrical Communication Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India in 1981 and Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1985. He is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Princeton University. He has served as an Associate Director for the Princeton Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. He is a Fellow of IEEE and ACM. He has co-authored five books, among which are “Switching and Finite Automata Theory, 3rd ed.” and “Testing of Digital Systems” that are textbooks being used around the world. He has served as the editor-in-chief of IEEE Transactions on VLSI Systems and on the editorial boards of several other IEEE Transactions. He is an author or co-author of more than 430 papers among which are 14 award-winning papers. His research interests include smart healthcare, machine learning, computer security, IoT, energy-efficient IC design, IC design automation, and monolithic 3D IC design.

2020: Life with 50 Billion Connected Devices

Gary Davis, McAfee, Inc.

Abstract:

It’s a sunny March morning in 2023. 7:18 AM. You’re buttering your bagel and gulping your coffee like always. You’re looking forward to your commute - you’ll do a conference call with your team and catch up on the news. You’re thankful you don’t have to actually drive, your car knows the way. As you get into your car you are presented with an urgent message. Your car has been immobilized and you need to pay 4 Bitcoin in ransom. You’re not going anywhere right now.
The world will have 50 billion connected devices by 2020. We’ve all heard this stat by now, but what does this really mean for individuals and society? What will be different? How fast will these shifts occur? Will we be ready?
Learn from one of the foremost IoT thought leaders how a world of sensors, devices and machines everywhere, some we see, others we don’t, sending vast quantities of data, will affect our daily lives, change our behaviors, and influence our thoughts about innovation, convenience, security and privacy. We’ll examine a day in the life of a digital citizen in 2020 and identify the implications of a world where nearly everything is connected.3 questions this session will answer:
• What does a world of 50 billion connected devices look like? What are all these devices, what are they doing and why?
• What are some of the major ways society and interpersonal relations will change in a world where nearly everything is connected?
• This world is coming – are we ready? What are some of the implications of this onslaught of connectivity on issues like privacy and security?

Speaker’s Bio:

Gary Davis is Chief Consumer Security Evangelist. Through a consumer lens, he partners with internal teams to drive strategic alignment of products with the needs of the security space. Gary also provides security education to businesses and consumers by distilling complex security topics into actionable advice. He is a sought-after speaker on trends in digital security including the evolving threat landscape, privacy and securing the Internet of Things. He has presented at high profile conferences and events including CES, Mobile World Congress, and CTIA Super Mobility.Gary has appeared on multiple business, security and consumer lifestyle broadcast outlets, including CBS News, CNBC, FOX News, Bloomberg, WSJ MoneyBeat and quoted in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Money Magazine, CNN, Forbes, TIME Magazine and more. During his 11+ years at Intel Security, he has held leadership roles in the consumer and enterprise divisions where he has helped shape various product portfolios and strategic direction along with advocating for cybersecurity education.Prior to joining McAfee, he held senior management positions for more than 20 years in technology companies. Gary served on the board of directors of the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA).Gary most recently spoke at Mobile World Congress and IoT North America.

Emerging NUI-based Methods for User Authentication

Nasir Memon
Computer Science and Engineering
New York University

Abstract:

As user demand and cost benefits of natural user interface (NUI) technologies are hastening their adoption, computing devices that come equipped with these interfaces are becoming ubiquitous. Consequently, authentication mechanisms on them are becoming an essential security component to enable a wider range of applications that need higher requirements of security as well as privacy. In this talk we will survey the landscape of “point-of-entry” user-device authentication mechanisms based on behavioral biometrics that require a natural user interaction using gestural or non-gestural interaction for access. This interaction includes 2-D touch gestures, 3-D gestures, voice, eye tracking, and braincomputer interaction.  We will analyze their potential security and usability promises and issues, and discuss plausible solutions that could be pursued in future work.

Biography:


 Nasir Memon is a professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at New York University (NYU) Tandon School of Engineering. He is one of the founding members of the Center for Cyber Security (CCS), a collaborative initiative of multiple schools within NYU including NYU- Steinhardt, NYU ‐ Wagner, NYU - Law. His research interests include digital forensics, biometrics, data compression, network security and security and human behavior.  Memon earned a Bachelor of Engineering in Chemical Engineering and a Master of Science in Mathematics from Birla Institute of Technology and Science (BITS) in Pilani, India. He received a Master of Science in Computer Science and a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Nebraska. He has published over 250 articles in journals and conference proceedings and holds a dozen patents in image compression and security. He has won several awards including the Jacobs Excellence in Education award and several best paper awards. He has been on the editorial boards of several journals and was the Editor‐In‐Chief of Transactions on Information Security and Forensics. He is an IEEE Fellow, an SPIE Fellow and was a distinguished lecturer of the IEEE Signal Processing Society.

 

 

 

Deep Learning Networks in CE

Petronel Bigioi, FotoNation

Abstract:

I could probably offer a half-way answer to “what is the next challenge for CE Imaging?”. Reality is that I don’t know for sure (there are many), but I know how to solve it: neural networks. The real question becomes how to enable low cost NN implementations and deployments in CE devices without the fear of losing years of work invested in training and optimizing the networks designed to solve specific problems (sound enhancement, better imaging, understanding of the surroundings, easier cooking, better coffee, etc..). This talk will detail the challenges and industry proven solutions for computer vision and computational imaging using a hybrid traditional imaging and deep learning approach. IP protection against intellectual theft once the solutions are deployed is also briefly discussed.

Biography:


Dr. Petronel Bigioi is Senior Vice President of engineering and general manager of FotoNation, a business unit of XPERICorporation. In this role, he leads a 100+ engineering team developing image processing solutions to address various problems in the digital still camera, mobile phone and other related markets. FotoNation technology can be found in more than 2.9 billion imaging devices worldwide.

Petronel got his B.Sc. in electronics engineering (1997) from Transilvania University, Brasov. Petronel also holds a couple of master degrees in ASIC design (Transilvania University, Brasov, 1998) and Networks and Communications(National University of Ireland, Galway, 2000). Petronel obtained his Ph.D. in electronics from Transilvania University (2005), his work being recognized by Romanian academy of science with a “Gheorghe Cartianu” award.

Petronel has over 40 presented and published papers and more than 500 grantedand published U.S. and international patents to date.Petronel is a IEEEfellow with over 20 years of experience in the digital still camera and mobile phone industries, working in both image processing and connectivity. A co-founder of severalsuccesfullcompanies (including FotoNation), he is also a pioneer of digital camera connectivity, a co-author and actively involved in the picture transfer protocol (PTP) and PTP-over-IP networks communication standards.

Married, father of four, Petronel enjoys photography, playing ping pong and is a music aficionado in his spare time.

Internet of Things Security: Are We Paranoid Enough?

Internet of Things Security: Are We Paranoid Enough?

Swarup Bhunia
Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Florida
Email: swarup@ece.ufl.edu

Abstract:

Security has become a critical design challenge for modern electronic hardware. With the emergence of the Internet of Things (IoT) regime that promises exciting new applications from smart cities to connected autonomous vehicles, security has come to the forefront of the system design process. Recent discoveries and reports on numerous security attacks on microchips and circuits violate the well-regarded concept of hardware trust anchors. It has prompted system designers to develop wide array of design-for-security and test/validation solutions to achieve high security assurance for electronic hardware. At the same time, emerging security issues and countermeasures have also led to interesting interplay between security, verification, and interoperability. Verification of hardware for security and trust at different levels of abstraction is rapidly becoming an integral part of the system design flow. The global economic trend that promotes outsourcing of design and fabrication process to untrusted facilities coupled with the prevalent practice of system on chip design using untrusted 3rd party IPs, has given rise to the critical need of trust verification of IPs, system-on-chip design, and fabricated chips. The talk will also cover spectrum of security challenges for IoTs and describe emerging solutions in creating secure trustworthy hardware that can enable IoT security for the mass.

Biography:


Swarup Bhunia is a preeminence professor of cybersecurity and Steven Yatauro endowed faculty fellow of Computer Engineering at University of Florida, FL, USA. Earlier he was appointed as the T. and A. Schroeder associate professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA. He has over twenty years of research and development experience with 250+ publications in peer-reviewed journals and premier conferences and six authored/edited books. His research interests include hardware security and trust, adaptive nanocomputing and novel test methodologies. Dr. Bhunia received IBM Faculty Award (2013), National Science Foundation career development award (2011), Semiconductor Research Corporation Inventor Recognition Award (2009), and SRC technical excellence award (2005) as a team member, and several best paper awards/nominations. He is co-founding editor-in-chief of a Springer journal on hardware and systems security. He has been serving as an associate editor of IEEE Transactions on CAD, IEEE Transactions on Multi-Scale Computing Systems, ACM Journal of Emerging Technologies, and Journal of Low Power Electronics; served as guest editor of IEEE Design & Test of Computers (2010, 2013) and IEEE Journal on Emerging and Selected Topics in Circuits and Systems (2014). He has served as co-program chair of IEEE IMS3TW 2011, IEEE NANOARCH 2013, IEEE VDAT 2014, and IEEE HOST 2015, and in the program committee of several IEEE/ACM conferences. Dr. Bhunia received his PhD from Purdue University on energy-efficient and robust electronics. He is a senior member of IEEE.

Proactive Cyber Security Response by Utilizing Passive Monitoring Technologies

Koji Nakao
National Information Communication Technologies (NICT), Japan
Yokohama National University – Guest Professor
CABINET SECRETARIAT – Special Security Advisor
Email: ko-nakao@nict.go.jp

Abstract:

Recently, variety of cyber-attacks such as DDoS, Information Leakage, Illegal Access, Spam, Business E-mail Compromise, Phishing, Advanced Persistent Threats (APT), Man-in-the-Middle attacks are frequently recognized even in the consumer’s environment. These cyber-attacks are often triggered by “malwares” and have been maliciously evolving and sometimes hidden from our monitoring countermeasures (FW, IDS/IPS). For proactively responding cyber-attacks, utilizing passive monitoring technologies should be reconsidered as possible security supportive solutions. In this talk, after introduction of latest cyber-attacks to share the current cyber threats landscape, passive monitoring technologies such as darknet and honeypot/sandbox will be explained with practical use-cases to accurately observe and monitor ongoing threats (cyber-attacks). The use-cases may include detection of malware-infected IoT devices by means of darknet and honeypot monitoring. Furthermore, detection of cyber-attacks by passive monitoring can be utilized for cyber security proactive response as practical solutions. Finally, future security considerations will be given for utilizing extendible passive monitoring technologies to proactively respond against cyber-attacks under smarter city and connected environments.

Biography:

Koji Nakao received the B.E. degree of Mathematics from Waseda University, in Japan, in 1979. Since joining KDDI in 1979, Koji has been engaged in the research on communication protocol, and information security technology for telecommunications in KDDI laboratory. He has started to additionally work for NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology) in 2004 and for Yokohama National University as a guest professor in 2015. Since 2000, he has been conducted for governmental security research projects and involved in International Security Standardization activities. His present positions are "Distinguished Researcher" to manage research activities for network security technologies in NICT and “Guest Professor” of Yokohama National University. Koji received the IPSJ Research Award in 1992, METI Ministry Award and KPMG Security Award in 2006, and Best Paper Award (JWIS) in 2007, the Commendation for Science and Technology award by the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (Prizes for Science and Technology: Research Category) in 2009, Lifetime Achievement Awards in ASIA-JCIS in 2012, Ministry Award (contributions for cyber security) from the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications in 2015. He is a member of IPJS and IEICE. Koji has also been a Special Security Advisor for CABINET SECRETARIAT in Japan since 2017.